Clarified Butter


Because of it’s higher “smoke point”, clarified butter is great for sautéing, It burns at a much higher temperature than butter that hasn’t been clarified and has almost no lactose, making it a great butter substitute for people who are lactose intolerant.  It’s really very easy to make and even keeps longer than regular butter.  To make a long story short, clarified butter is definitely something you should have in your fridge.

All you’re really doing here is separating out the water and milk fats from unsalted butter.

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Use These…
  • Unsalted butter

 

Do This…

From the photo above, you can see I normally do this a pound at a time, but you can do as much or little as you like.

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Place the unsalted butter in a sauce pan on medium high heat to melt.

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Bring the butter up to a foamy boil and then lower the heat low to maintain a simmer.

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As the butter simmers you’ll see the milk fats accumulating on the surface of the melted butter.  You’ll need to carefully skim this foam off the top as it accumulates with a spoon.  You don’t need to save the foam, I just did it to demonstrate the process.

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Eventually, you’ll find that the foam stops accumulating and the liquid becomes very clear, but there will probably bee some small brown bits on the bottom of the pan that will still need to be removed.  I use a fine strainer for this.  You can pour it through a coffee filter, but I don’t have the patience for that.

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Let the butter cool and then put it in a refrigerator safe container and refrigerate.  It’ will end up as a dense solid you can use just like un-clarified butter.

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You can see a few brown bits on the bottom of the bowl here, They’re really no big deal, but using a coffee filter would remove them if you really want.

Clarified Butter

Use These…
  • Unsalted butter

 

 

 

IMG_20150403_140253-01
Do This…

 

  1. From the photo above, you can see I normally do this a pound at a time, but you can do as much or little as you like.
  2. Place the unsalted butter in a sauce pan on medium high heat to melt.
  3. Bring the butter up to a foamy boil and then lower the heat low to maintain a simmer.
  4. As the butter simmers you’ll see the milk fats accumulating on the surface of the melted butter.  You’ll need to carefully skim this foam off the top as it accumulates with a spoon.  You don’t need to save the foam, I just did it to demonstrate the process.
  5. Eventually, you’ll find that the foam stops accumulating and the liquid becomes very clear, but there will probably bee some small brown bits on the bottom of the pan that will still need to be removed.  I use a fine strainer for this.  You can pour it through a coffee filter, but I don’t have the patience for that.
  6. Let the butter cool and then put it in a refrigerator safe container and refrigerate.  It’ will end up as a dense solid you can use just like un-clarified butter.

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